get out


get out
phrasal verb
Word forms "get out":
present tense I/you/we/they get out he/she/it gets out present participle getting out past tense got out past participle got out
1)
a) [intransitive] used for telling someone to leave

The teacher screamed at him to get out.

get out of:

Get out of my house!

b) get someone out
[transitive] to make another person leave

Get that man out of my bedroom!

2) [intransitive] to go to different places and spend time enjoying yourself

We don't get out much, as we have a young baby.

3) [transitive] to remove something that is inside or mixed with something else

I washed the shirt twice, but I couldn't get the stain out.

get something out of something:

Mike got a splinter of glass out of Jenny's toe.

4) [intransitive] if something secret gets out, a lot of people find out about it

There was a huge public outcry when the news got out.

get out that:

It quickly got out that Marie was leaving Danny.

5) get someone out
[transitive] to remove someone from their job, especially from a position of political power

They were confident they could get the Conservatives out.

6) [transitive] to manage to say something

He tried to protest, but couldn't get the words out.

7) [transitive] to make something such as a new book available for people to buy

There was the usual rush to get the dictionary out on time.

8) get out!
mainly American spoken used for saying you are surprised by something or do not believe it

English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • get out — {v. phr.} 1. Leave or depart. * / Get out of here! the teacher shouted angrily to the misbehaving student./ * / Driver, I want to get out by the opera. / 2. To publish; produce. * /Our press is getting out two new books on ecology./ 3. To escape; …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get out — {v. phr.} 1. Leave or depart. * / Get out of here! the teacher shouted angrily to the misbehaving student./ * / Driver, I want to get out by the opera. / 2. To publish; produce. * /Our press is getting out two new books on ecology./ 3. To escape; …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get-out — /get owt /, n. 1. Com. the break even point. 2. Chiefly Brit. a method or maneuver used to escape a difficult or embarrassing situation; cop out: The scoundrel has used that get out once too often. 3. as all get out, Informal. in the extreme; to… …   Universalium

  • Get Out — may refer to: *Get Out (board game), the earliest board games published by Cheapass Games *Get Out (album), an album by Capercaillie *Leave (Get Out), a song by JoJo …   Wikipedia

  • get-out — get ,out adjective MAINLY BRITISH INFORMAL allowing you to avoid an obligation or a difficult situation: a get out clause as all get out AMERICAN MAINLY SPOKEN used for emphasizing how strong a quality or behavior is: as boring/smart/mean/pretty… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • get-out — [get′out΄] n. escape from an unpleasant situation ☆ all get out Informal the extreme degree, quality, etc. [big as all get out] …   English World dictionary

  • get out — [v] escape alight, avoid, beat it*, begone, be off, break out, bug off*, buzz off*, clear out, decamp, depart, dodge, duck, egress, evacuate, evade, exit, extricate oneself, flee, fly, free oneself, go, hightail*, kite*, leave, make tracks*, run… …   New thesaurus

  • get out of — ► get out of contrive to avoid or escape. Main Entry: ↑get …   English terms dictionary

  • get out — index quit (evacuate) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • get-out — to indicate a high degree of something, attested from 1838 …   Etymology dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.